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Now You See it, Now You Don't

Have you ever wondered what it might have been like to live and work in a communist state, behind the iron curtain? A country where photocopiers were illegal, where there was no communication with the outside world except BBC World Service radio? A state where it took fifteen years to get a telephone, or where you had to be careful what you said and to whom? Englishwoman, Marion Merrick, did exactly that in 1982, before the collapse of the Berlin wall, emmigrating to Hungary where only ten other British people lived.

The only book written on the subject, "Now You See It, Now You Don’t (1982-1989) and House of Cards (1989-1996)" is Marion Merrick’s unique dual-volume personal account of life in Budapest, both pre- and post the collapse of Soviet power.

"Now You See It, Now You Don’t (1982-1989)" vividly describes the everyday world encountered in Budapest which disappeared following the changes after the fall of the Berlin wall. The book chronicles the author's first - and communism’s last - seven years in Hungary: a life full of absurdities and illogicalities, yet also brimming with the characters and unique atmosphere which led her to stay.

"House of Cards (1989-1996)" provides the sequel, following the fate of the country and its people in the first seven years of post-communist Hungary. The book shows how the initial joy and disbelief at the 1989 implosion of the regime led to the realities of such a dramatic change - a change that left no-one's life unaltered.

'It is a pleasure to read Marion Merrick’s very well written text…. You feel you are right there yourself as she ‘tells it how it was’, amid the minutiae of everyday life.' - Bob Dent, Budapest Times

'It is this detail which makes the story highly entertaining, fascinating and resonant.' - Budapest Sun

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