This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

Click to enlarge
Thirst: A Novel On The Iran-Iraq War
X

On a strategic hill overlooking the frontier, Iraqi and Iranian troops battle for access to a water tank. The troops are thirsty and on the brink of madness. They are, moreover, characters in a novel being written by an Iraqi journalist. That is, if he is given the chance to write it, a chance denied him by an Iraqi
major who is in charge of a military prison and commands the journalist to write a fictitious report about a murder in the camp in the hope of demoralizing enemy soldiers.

At the same time, on the other side of the border, an Iranian author writes the story of the same troop of soldiers but from an Iranian perspective. He, likewise, is interrupted, not by external forces, but by memories of his first encounter with a gun…

Told in a kaleidoscopic style that weaves between the ongoing battle and the struggles of the writers, Thirst is rich with dark humour and surreal images. The emphasis on maintaining humanity and individual identity during war shows, once again, why Mahmoud Dowlatabadi is the most important Iranian writer of the last century.

Mahmoud Dowlatabadi is one of the most prominent Iranian novelist of his generation. His novels include Kelidar (1999), Soluk (2005), Missing Soluch (1979) and The Colonel, which was shortlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize in 2011.

Reviews:

'Mr. Dowlatabadi draws a detailed, realist picture of Iranian life, especially that of the rural poor, in language that is complex and lyrical, rather than simplistic.' - The Financial Times

'It's about time everyone even remotely interested in Iran read this novel.' - The Independent

User Reviews

Add your own review
Write a Review
Code Image - Please contact webmaster if you have problems seeing this image code Load new code
There are no reviews for this product