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An Ottoman Traveller: Selections from the Book of Travels of Evliya Celebi
Evliya Çelebi was the Orhan Pamuk of the 17th century, the Pepys of the Ottoman world - a diligent, adventurous and honest recorder with a puckish wit and humour. He is in the pantheon of the great travel-writers of the world, though virtually unknown to western readers. This brand new translation by the foremost scholar of his age brings Evliya sparkling back to life, so that we can relish his charm and intelligence once more, whether he is describing high jinks in the bath-houses, being kidnapped by bandits, Ottoman Istanbul in its baroque heyday or a worldwide convention of trapeze artists.

'Evliya Çelebi was the widest-eyed, most intensely curious, inquisitive and prolific travel writer the Ottoman world ever produced. A learned and perceptive gentleman-observer from courtly Istanbul at the height of its power, Evilya's work records and preserves an entire world otherwise lost to history. A proper edition of his massive work has long been overdue, and Robert Dankoff magnificently translates the highlights for us, in a book which is likely to change for ever our perceptions of the Ottoman Empire.' - William Dalrymple

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