This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

Click to enlarge
Patagonia: A Cultural History
Patagonia is the ultimate landscape of the mind. Like Siberia and the Sahara, it has become a metaphor for nothingness and extremity. Its frontiers have stretched beyond the political boundaries of Argentina and Chile to encompass an evocative idea of place. A vast triangle at the southern tip of the New World, this region of barren steppes, soaring peaks and fierce winds was populated by small tribes of hunter-gatherers and roaming nomads when Ferdinand Magellan made landfall in 1520. A fateful moment for the natives, this was the start of an era of adventure and exploration. Soon Sir Francis Drake and John Byron, and sailors from Europe and America, would be exploring Patagonia s bays and inlets, mapping fjords and channels, whaling, sifting the streams for gold in the endless search for Eldorado. As the land was opened up in the nineteenth century, a crazed Frenchman declared himself King. A group of Welsh families sailed from Liverpool to Northern Patagonia to found a New Jerusalem in the desert. Further down the same river, Butch and Sundance took time out from bank robbing to run a small ranch near the Patagonian Andes. All these, and later travel writers, have left sketches and records, memoirs and diaries evoking Patagonia s grip on the imagination. From the empty plains to the crashing seas, from the giant dinosaur fossils to glacial sculptures, the landscape has inspired generations of travellers and artists. LAND OF MYTH AND LEGEND: the big foot Indians and sea monsters; the mad King of Araucania and Patagonia; penal colonies and Nazi fugitives. LAND OF EXPLORERS AND SETTLERS: Magellan and Drake; the journey of the Beagle; Welsh migrants and gauchos; Salesians and sheep farmers. LAND OF WRITERS: W. H. Hudson and Charles Darwin; Chatwin and Theroux; Baudrillard s post-modern Patagonia.

User Reviews

Add your own review
Write a Review
Code Image - Please contact webmaster if you have problems seeing this image code Load new code
There are no reviews for this product