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Seeking Provence

A region steeped in fable and myth, Provence can accurately be called on the cultural crossroads of European history. A source of inspiration to artists, poets and troubadours it is also an enviable refuge for the wealthy and fashionable. Writer Nicholas Woodsworth married into a Provencal family and has lived in the region for decades. He lovingly and carefully notes every facet and detail of life in Provence and provides a refreshing antidote to the rose and romantic view of it being a perennial sunny destination for tourists.

Nicholas Woodsworth was born in Ottawa, Canada in 1953 and grew up in a diplomatic family in Africa and Asia. He graduated in Asian history. He began newspaper freelancing after settling in Aix-en-Provence in his mid-20s. He became the Financial Times Africa Correspondent in the late 1980s, and was the Weekend FT's staff travel writer from 1989 to 2003. His interest in the Mediterranean, since expanded to include the entire region, began with his marriage to his Provencal wife.

Reviews:

'... When I knock off that one, a squat travelbook beckons, "Seeking Provence: Old Myths, New Paths,” part of a British series from Haus Publishing called Armchair Traveller, distributed in the United States by Consortium. Like Tuscany, Provence has been trampled over by too many writers in recent years. But Nicholas Woodsworth, a former Africa correspondent for the Financial Times and a Provençal by marriage, looks as though he could break the curse of Mayle. I’m giving him a chance. Labor Day in Provence in New York. That is an unbeatable combination.' - William Grimes New York Times 2008-08-29

'I enjoyed his quest more than I have enjoyed any other book on Provence since I re-read James Pope-Hennessy’s Aspects of Provence. Believe me, that’s saying something.' - Anthony Peregrine Sunday Telegraph 2008-08-29

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