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The Road To Santiago: Walking The Way Of St James
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I felt that if I could reach the end of the continent, I would find the answer to some important question there, writes Paul Auster in Moon over Manhattan. I had no idea what this question might be, but the answer to it was already preconceived in my steps. I only had to keep going in order to discover that I had left myself behind and was no longer the same person as before. When you reach the edge of the continent having walked along the Way of St James, which pilgrims of former times thought to be the end of the world, only then do you realise that the old pilgrim s saying is true: the journey does not end in Santiago. The journey begins in Santiago. In this vivid travelogue René Freund not only introduces the reader to the overwhelming natural beauty he encountered during his pilgrimage, but also shares with them his experience of reaching his physical and psychological limits during this arduous journey on foot to the end of the world . 

René Freund was born in 1967 in Vienna. He currently lives in the Austrian Salzkammergut and has worked as a journalist, translator and dramatic producer.


Review:

'A wonderfully wry and amusing account of what it is like to be a modern-day pilgrim... The author describes looking up and seeing a fighter jet screaming overhead. 'It would take a jet less than an hour to get to Santiago,' Freund cannot help reflecting, 'and we still have six weeks ahead of us. We are walking anachronisms.' Yet it is precisely the anachronistic quality of what he is doing that makes it so fascinating.' - Independent on the hardback edition

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