This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

Click to enlarge
The Essential Yusuf Idris

Yusuf Idris (1927-91), who belonged to the same generation of pioneering Egyptian writers as Naguib Mahfouz and Tawfiq al-Hakim, is widely celebrated as the father of the Arabic short story, just as Mahfouz is considered the father of the Arabic novel. Idris studied medicine and practised as a doctor, but even as a student his interests were in politics and the support of the nationalist struggle, and in writing and his writing, whether in his regular newspaper columns or in his fiction, often reflected his political convictions. He was nominated for the Nobel prize for literature more than once, and when the prize went to Naguib Mahfouz in 1988, Idris felt that he had been passed over because of his outspoken views on Israel. In all, Yusuf Idris wrote some twelve collections of superbly crafted short stories, mainly about ordinary, poor people, many of which have been translated into English and are included in this collection of the best of his work. But although he is best known for his short stories, he also wrote nine plays and a number of novels and novellas, the best of which are also sampled here.

Yusuf Idris (1927 91), who belonged to the same generation of pioneering Egyptian writers as Naguib Mahfouz and Tawfiq al-Hakim, is widely celebrated as the father of the Arabic short story, just as Mahfouz is considered the father of the Arabic novel. Idris studied medicine and practised as a doctor, but even as a student his interests were in politics and the support of the nationalist struggle, and in writing and his writing, whether in his regular newspaper columns or in his fiction, often reflected his political convictions. He was nominated for the Nobel prize for literature more than once, and when the prize went to Naguib Mahfouz in 1988, Idris felt that he had been passed over because of his outspoken views on Israel.

User Reviews

Add your own review
Write a Review
Code Image - Please contact webmaster if you have problems seeing this image code Load new code
There are no reviews for this product